Steve’s Seminar : Elevations

As designers we produce elevations of interiors to give the ‘viewer’ a more in depth perspective of interior furnishings/decorations that the plan view misses off. Typically a view from one side, it is a flat representation of one or more walls, shown in no perspective. These elevations of installations objects or spaces can be both interior and exterior views and describe the relationship between the floor and elevation plan, with extra description of furnished such as wall frames, furniture and external appearance.

This is a simple plan and elevation view of the exterior of a large house or restaurant.

This is a simple plan and elevation view of the exterior of a large house or restaurant.

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=a+plan+and+elevation+plan&espv=2&biw=1242&bih=606&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAWoVChMI1aOsjPTlyAIVRUYmCh3lvAYz#imgrc=UbvW2pjZfiFgmM%3A

You can see from the elevation view, certain characteristics such as glass windows, and the certain types of cladding added into two halves of the exterior. Without the elevation the architects and builders would not be noted of this extra information required.

We did some teaser elevations by looking at a set of perspective blocks, our task was to create both plans and elevations from the blocks and I realized I have quite a good level of understanding for perspective. The only thing I found difficult was to produce equal and accurate box shaped drawings, but I feel this will come with practice.

Here we drew images of stacks of cubes from both plan and elevation views. I find visualization tasks like these relatively easy and enjoyable to complete.

Here we drew images of stacks of cubes from both plan and elevation views. I find visualization tasks like these relatively easy and enjoyable to complete.

These are freehand sketches of the same cube stacks, except with an extended elevation. For example if you were to walk around two sides fo the stack, you would draw what you saw as a continuous 2D image which has no bends.

These are freehand sketches of the same cube stacks, except with an extended elevation. For example if you were to walk around two sides fo the stack, you would draw what you saw as a continuous 2D image which has no bends.

 

Elevations for me were a challenge at first, I learnt that I needed more measurements than I initially thought to create an elevation. Working to strict millimeters at first attempt impossible but as I worked through my mistakes and successes I feel I begun to develop a good level of understanding.

As a home work task, we were directed the challenge of drawing and producing our own elevations of a room in our accommodation, the tools I used to complete this task was a tape measure, a scale ruler and a pencil. These are lengthy tasks as I practiced working with measuring tapes and conversions. I made few errors and feel pleased with the outcome of my extended elevations.

This is one of my elevations showing my bathroom door, my bed and the wall running vertically to my bed. The shelves were probably most of the challenge as a lot of careful measurements need to be taken in order to find its accurate position.

This is one of my elevations showing my bathroom door, my bed and the wall running vertically to my bed. The shelves were probably most of the challenge as a lot of careful measurements need to be taken in order to find its accurate position. I drew this elevation at a scale of 1:20 @A3

Here is my other elevation. Particularity i found the radiator and the mirror the most difficult as they were not in line with any other object so a lot of careful measurement needed to be taken.

Here is my other elevation. Particularity i found the radiator and the mirror the most difficult as they were not in line with any other object so a lot of careful measurement needed to be taken.

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